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A Black Candidate Runs on Civil Rights in 1940s New York

The Japanese distributed leaflets over the South Pacific that asked, "If Americans are fighting for the freedom and equality of all people, why aren't Negro Americans allowed to play big league baseball?" Ben Davis, an African-American candidate for [...]

An Aviation Hero Advocates Isolationism

The interwar peace movement was arguably the largest mass movement of the 1920s and 1930s, a mobilization often overlooked in the wake of the broad popular consensus that ultimately supported the U.S. involvement in World War II. The destruction [...]

African American Workers: Conflict on the Homefront

In this lesson students analyze a propaganda poster, a photograph, and a poem to understand the tensions unleashed by the entry of African Americans into the industrial workforce during World War II.

Active Viewing: The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter

In this activity, students watch film clips from the documentary The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter, decode a propaganda poster, and analyze statistics about working women during World War II.  Parts of this activity can be completed without [...]

"Americans all, let's fight for victory: Americanos todos, luchamos por la victoria"

Mexicans and Mexican Americans contributed in many ways to the United States' war effort during World War II. About 19% of all Mexican Americans signed up for the armed forces; nearly 17,000 Mexican Americans in Los Angeles worked in the area's [...]

A War Worker Finds New Independence on the Job

When Los Angeles resident Beatrice Morales Clifton went to work at the Lockheed Aircraft plant in Burbank, California, she was a married mother of four children. In this excerpt from a longer interview, Morales Clifton, the daughter of Mexican [...]

African Americans Workers and Conflict on the Homefront worksheet

This worksheet helps students analyze three primary sources as part of the activity "African American Workers: Conflict on the Homefront."

Incarcerated Japanese and Guard "Greet" New Arrivals at Manzanar

These Japanese Americans in the newly opened Manzanar Relocation Center had gathered to watch the arrival of fellow internees. Manzanar was the incarceration site located nearest to Los Angeles. It was surrounded by barbed wire, with manned guard [...]

Map of Japanese Incarceration Sites

The U.S. government forced more than 100,000 Japanese Americans to leave their homes and businesses on the West Coast and report to one of fifteen assembly centers. At these centers they were first processed and then transported by train to one of [...]

Table of Incarcerated Japanese Populations, 1942-1946

The U.S. government forced more than 100,000 Japanese Americans to leave their homes and businesses on the West Coast and report to one of fifteen assembly centers. At these centers they were first processed and then transported by train to one of [...]


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